Sermons on reframe the quesiton

Sermons on reframe the quesiton

13th Sunday after Pentecost/Proper 15

Disorientation is really hard. It’s uncomfortable. It makes our heart hurt. It shakes our beliefs to the core. All that we have believed had been true is suddenly not. It’s what the psalmist wrote about and it’s what we experience in life over and over again, if we’re honest with ourselves. The prosperity gospel tells us all these things are bad, and yet the gospel of Jesus Christ tells us that in each of these moments, resurrection is possible. And that’s the difference between what the psalmist experienced: if it’s bad, it must mean God is absent and needs to be reminded to pay attention and us, as Christians, who will say, if we are disoriented, if we are experiencing something that appears and feels very bad, then God is present and is inviting us into something new. This is a huge distinction. Reorientation, not the previous state of orientation, follows disorientation in the Christian faith

20th Sunday after Pentecost

So I invite you to think about the questions your heart is asking of God this day? What are you talking with God about? What are you wondering about? What do you want from God? And then think about how you and God might reframe that question to get at what really matters to God? Perhaps it matters to you that you find the next best job for yourself. But perhaps it matters more to God that your discernment involves the criteria of how best may you use all of your life to bring God’s goodness into the world? Or perhaps God is really asking you a question you had not yet pondered, and is inviting you to a place of healing that will allow you to be changed at depth, and take that more whole place into the world. Sometimes God invites us into a conversation we didn’t even know we should be having. That happened to me in the desert on an open day of reflection and prayer. God and I had a conversation, which I hadn’t even known was on my radar.